FSDP Brings the Voice of our Families to Aspiring Medical Professionals

IMG_1960One of FSDP’s missions is to bring the family voice to the various segments of our society that directly impact our health. So I was excited to be joined by FSDP members Brooke Feldman and Kenneth Anderson, as well as Fred Goldstein, Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) to share our perspectives on a panel discussion for medical students, “The Culture and Misperceptions of Addiction”, held at PCOM on Thursday, January 5, 2017.

The panel allowed us to reach healthcare providers at the beginning of their careers with a message about harm reduction, drug policy reform, progressive treatment and recovery, and substance use as public health and human rights issues. IMG_7851The audience of medical students were actively engaged and their questions prompted discussion about the nature of addiction, co-morbidity (dual diagnosis), engaging people in treatment, stigma, policy, epidemiology of substance use, impediments to effective care, conflicts of doctors…

Ken Anderson, founder of Harm Reduction, Abstinence and Moderation Support (HAMS) shared his expertise about the epidemiology and myths of substance use, addictIMG_7845ion, and recovery. Recovery advocate Brooke Feldman shared her unique perspectives on the lived experience of substance users, stigma, and the unique paths taken by people in recovery. I addressed some of the issues around the influences of culture and policy on substance users and families, and strategies for engaging young people and families in treatment.IMG_7846

Many thanks to our gracious hosts at PCOM, especially Maggie Gergen for coordinating the event, and FSDP Harm Reduction Epidemiologist April Wilson Smith for developing this event, and Co-Founder Carol Katz Beyer for her guidance.

FSDP is the Voice of the Family at UNGASS 2016

ungass2016_0Families for Sensible Drug Policy (FSDP) is representing the voice of families impacted by substance use at the United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the World Drug Problem in New York City on April 19-21, 2016.

UNGASS 2016 is a meeting of the United Nations member states to assess and debate global issues such as health, gender, or in this case, the world’s drug control priorities.

The last time a special session on drugs was held, in 1998, its focus was the total elimination of drugs from the world. UNGASS 2016 Today, political leaders and citizens are pushing to rethink that ineffective and dangerous approach.

Why this summit matters

International debates on drugs are rarely more than reaffirmations of the established system. But 2016 is different because never before have so many governments voice displeasure with international drug control approaches. Never before, to this degree, have citizens around the world have put drug law reform on the agenda and passed regulatory proposals by referenda or popular campaigns. Never before have the health benefits of harm reduction approaches—which prevent overdose and transmission of diseases like HIV—been clearer. For the first time, there is significant dissent at the local, national, and international levels.

Why the family voice in drug policy matters

The role of the family is what is missing from much of the drug policy debate. Substance use doesn’t takes place in a vacuum but in the normal context of family life and relationships as well as the wider culture that the family resides in. Families are in a unique position to directly influence the development or resolution of substance use problems.

UNGASS 2016 held an Informal Interactive Stakeholder Consultation in February 2016 to give nonprofit and civil society organizations from around the world an opportunity to submit their statements and recommendations for drug policy reform. With the input and support of our diverse community of stakeholders and advocates, Barry Lessin made this statement at this meeting on behalf of the families of FSDP.
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We will co-sponsor this Day of Protest and Action with the Drug Policy Alliance, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, The Center for Optimal Living and Help Not Handcuffs culminating in a workshop that bridges the gap between public policy and our homes, between parents and children, and connects the voices of diverse impacted communities.

 

 

 

We’re Bringing Dr. Robert Meyer’s CRAFT Workshop to Philadelphia

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We are excited to be partnering with the Parents Translational Research Center at the Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia, PA to bring Dr. Robert Meyers highly acclaimed Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) workshop to Philadelphia, PA from March 28, 2016 — March 30, 2016.

Supported by 20 years of peer-reviewed research, Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) is a comprehensive behavioral program that teaches families to optimize their impact on substance using loved ones while avoiding confrontation or detachment. CRAFT methods are evidence-based and provide families with a hopeful, positive, and more effective alternative to addressing substance problems than other intervention programs.

For complete information about the workshop click here: CRAFT PHILADELPHIA Brochure. Space is limited, so sign up today. Completion of this training is the first step toward becoming a certified CRAFT therapist. Continuing Education credits will be awarded upon satisfactory completion. For those of you who aren’t aware of CRAFT or if you want more information about the CRAFT approach, please check out this link.

Below is a testimonial by Dr. William R. Miller about Bob Meyers and the CRAFT trainings:

‘Bob Meyers has made exemplary contributions to knowledge about the treatment of substance abuse and dependence, overseeing two decades of programmatic research to develop, refine, adapt, test and disseminate CRAFT. Bob is an exceptional human being and colleague. He is a superb clinical teacher who garners top marks from audiences ranging from counselors in recovery to doctoral-level health professionals. Dr. Meyers brings extraordinary energy, compassion, depth and humanity to his research, treatment and training’. 

William R. Miller, Ph.D. Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry. 

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We look forward to seeing all interested mental health professionals there!