FSPD brings a Weekend of Family Empowerment to the United States

TFDS NYC Workshphe inspirational and motivational moments shared with internationally acclaimed Family Drug Support founder, Tony Trimingham at the International Harm Reduction Conference in Montreal, Canada #HR17 will continue with a dynamic and thought provoking celebration of family empowerment next week in New York City with an extraordinary weekend filled with enlightenment and hope. 

When: May 20, 2017, 10am to 4pm

Where: Center for Optimal Living, 370 Lexington Ave, Suite 500, New York, NY.

FREE Sign up herehttp://support.bpt.me/

Our families have a vital role in the development and resolution of how substance use impacts their home—for far too long our families have not been afforded the opportunity to engage as active participants and problem-solvers.

We remain humbled and honored to serve our growing network of families who are asking for non judgmental alternatives to support optimal health and well-being for their loved ones impacted by substance use while managing their own needs and self care in the process. Attendees will learn how to become ambassadors for your community by implementing a new paradigm of support for families impacted by substance use by becoming a Family Drug Support meeting facilitator.

The FDS model has enjoyed much success over the last 20 years because it presents viable alternatives for families to explore potential solutions and coping strategies. It introduces reality-based concepts and tools based on what families need, expect and experience.

The concepts are based in harm reduction approaches of meeting families where they are, listening and understanding, changing language, dropping labels, stages of change for drug users and their families. coping with positive changes and challenges, while challenging your triggers and assumptions.

This workshop, co-hosted by FSDP, Family Drug Support, Center for Optimal Living, New York Harm Reduction Educators (NYHRE), and Washington Heights CORNER Project.

We are energized and privileged to bring the FDS model of family support to our cherished friends here in the United States and are busy working behind the scenes in preparation to launch our inaugural family support meeting!

Weekend Part 2

FDS SIF event rev

Last year almost 54,000 lives were lost as a consequence of accidental overdose. Many of these deaths could have been prevented by ensuring that our loved ones had access to a full continuum of care that is rooted in science and compassion. Our families deserve person-centered screenings and alternative solutions that meet them where they are with the goal of optimal health and wellness based on individual needs and unique circumstance

Co-sponsored by FSDP, Family Drug Support, Center for Optimal Living, New York Harm Reduction Educators (NYHRE), Washington Heights CORNER Project, Students for Sensible Drug Policy and Community Insite, join us at a FREE panel including International harm reduction pioneers Tony Trimingham and Liz Evans and others, presenting life-saving alternatives to public injection and overdose from other countries

When: Sunday, May 21, 2017, 11:30am

Where: Malcom X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Center, 3940 Broadway, at 165th St, NYC

FREE Sign up here: http://opioidresponse.bpt.me

Evidence from years of research is conclusive that Supervised Injection Facilities (#SIFs) reduce HIV and hepatitis transmission risks, prevent overdose deaths, reduce public injections, reduce discarded syringes, and increase the number of people who enter drug treatment. Across the globe, there have been no reported fatalities from an overdose in an SIF.

A preponderance of evidence also shows that clients of SIFs are more likely to go to detox and quit injection drug use over time. SIFs increase access to lifesaving services and restore some of the humanity and dignity that drug users deserve by offering them a safe place to access medically supervised care and other related services.

“If synthetic opioids are in fact becoming the new norm in terms of distribution and consumption, then drug checking and supervised injection sites ought to become the new public health norms too.” — Rick Lines, Executive Director of Harm Reduction International #HR17.

FSDP embraces enlightened drug policies to empower families, restore health, and save lives..

#FSDPSaysOurFamiliesDeserveSIF’s

 

FSDP Brings the Voice of our Families to Aspiring Medical Professionals

IMG_1960One of FSDP’s missions is to bring the family voice to the various segments of our society that directly impact our health. So I was excited to be joined by FSDP members Brooke Feldman and Kenneth Anderson, as well as Fred Goldstein, Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) to share our perspectives on a panel discussion for medical students, “The Culture and Misperceptions of Addiction”, held at PCOM on Thursday, January 5, 2017.

The panel allowed us to reach healthcare providers at the beginning of their careers with a message about harm reduction, drug policy reform, progressive treatment and recovery, and substance use as public health and human rights issues. IMG_7851The audience of medical students were actively engaged and their questions prompted discussion about the nature of addiction, co-morbidity (dual diagnosis), engaging people in treatment, stigma, policy, epidemiology of substance use, impediments to effective care, conflicts of doctors…

Ken Anderson, founder of Harm Reduction, Abstinence and Moderation Support (HAMS) shared his expertise about the epidemiology and myths of substance use, addictIMG_7845ion, and recovery. Recovery advocate Brooke Feldman shared her unique perspectives on the lived experience of substance users, stigma, and the unique paths taken by people in recovery. I addressed some of the issues around the influences of culture and policy on substance users and families, and strategies for engaging young people and families in treatment.IMG_7846

Many thanks to our gracious hosts at PCOM, especially Maggie Gergen for coordinating the event, and FSDP Harm Reduction Epidemiologist April Wilson Smith for developing this event, and Co-Founder Carol Katz Beyer for her guidance.

FSDP at the Southern Opioid Epidemic Symposium

FSDP’s Co-Founders Barry Lessin and Carol Katz Beyer, and our Harm Reduction Coordinator Jeremy Galloway represented us at the Southern Opioid Epidemic Symposium held at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health this past week.

The symposium convened academic, medical, research, policy, and government stakeholders to identify and develop strategies to advance a comprehensive response to the opioid epidemic in the South and beyond.

Barry Lessin was invited to speak, and here’s the text of of his talk “The Significance of the Family in Developing Harm Reduction Strategies and Practices in the Southeast and Beyond:

15541250_1393299694023257_4760824146094682188_n“I’m an aging hippie from the VietNam war protest days when I came of age, during the drugs, sex, and rock and roll era and as a result developed an ingrained distrust of the federal government.

When FSDP was invited to join the Southern Collaborative on Opioid Harm Reduction , my initial thought was ‘Oh my God, I’m going to meet with the government to talk about drug use. I hope they don’t ask me too many questions about my past’. My worry and disbelief quickly dissolved when we got to the meeting and saw how serious the government is about attacking the opioid problem with comprehensive harm reduction …

We’re again a very divided nation, even more so in some ways, but I have optimism because of our ability to convene forums like this to tap into the brilliant minds gathered here to identify life-saving solutions to this public health epidemic.

So being here is an exciting and encouraging moment for myself, co-founder Carol Beyer, Jeremy Galloway and the 1000s of families and diverse stakeholders we represent because it’s an opportunity to be a part of process of an ongoing collaboration with this esteemed community to address the needs of the millions of families who have suffered the direct consequences and collateral damage of substance use and the existing harmful drug policies.

FSDP is a global coalition of families, professionals, organizations and drug policy reform advocates who view substance use through a human rights and public health lens. Viewed this way, Harm reduction interventions, are a natural fit for managing substance use, but have rarely found their way into family settings.

We have listened to our families, parents and users alike, sharing their lived experiences of being harmed by a broken treatment system that uses ineffective, often unregulated treatment methods, that treat people more like commodities to fill beds than patients being provided effective care.

When people relapse with other complex problems similar to addiction that require lifestyle changes like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, we don’t blame the person for treatment failures, we don’t tell them they’re in denial, or they ‘need to ready’ or they must ‘hit bottom, we don’t throw them in jail, or kick them out of schools.

With other conditions, we respond with scientific, commonsense, and compassionate approaches and we look at the treatment methods that are failing them and do more research to provide better treatments.

Families are in a unique position to directly influence the development or resolution of substance use problems because substance use doesn’t take place in a vacuum but in the normal context of family life and relationships as well as the wider culture that the family resides in.

We know that problematic substance use is a complex interaction of psychological, biological and socio-cultural variables. Prohibition-based drug policies directly contribute to a cultural narrative that views the substance as the primary problem, ignoring the uniqueness of each family, the culture it exists in, as well as the family’s strengths and resources.

We don’t have to reinvent the wheel–harm reduction approaches are already in place for other conditions. We can use this knowledge to extend these benefits to implement family-friendly strategies and practices in combatting the opioid problem.

FSDP bring diverse communities together to embrace enlightened drug policies—empowering families, restoring health, saving lives. We are dedicated to identify a vision and approach that will provide solutions and pathways forward…

Our meeting here offers us an opportunity for us to engage with the communities brought together here who share the public health lens of substance use, to be catalysts for change by tapping into your knowledge as scientists, educators, and healthcare providers to eventually develop the necessary strategies and practices and the hands-on tools to offer our families to restore our health to the level we deserve.”