Special Evening for Families with Dr. Robert Meyers, Developer of CRAFT

FSDP’s latest collaboration with Dr. Bob Meyers, the developer of Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT), and Andrew Tatarsky and his Center for Optimal Living will give attendees a unique opportunity to meet Drs. Meyers and Tatarsky, hear an overview of the CRAFT treatment model and be part of a Q & A to follow.

FAMILY CRAFT

This special evening will be hosted by FSDP Cofounders Carol Katz Beyer and Barry Lessin.

WHEN AND WHERE:

Friday March 10, 2017, 6:30- 8pm.

The Center for Optimal Living, 370 Lexington Ave, Suite 500, NYC 10017

Tickets are still available but space is LIMITED, so SIGN-UP NOW!

For additional information, please email barry@fsdp.org.

CRAFT fosters a different journey toward treatment and recovery for families. It is love-based and empowers families to stay TOGETHER rather than “detaching” or using harsh, punishing methods with loved ones.

Supported by 20 years of peer-reviewed research, CRAFT is a comprehensive behavioral program that teaches families to optimize their impact while avoiding confrontation or detachment. Most programs developed to promote or encourage positive lifestyle changes are not always built upon the level of long-term research and analysis that supports CRAFT as a successful model for engaging substance users toward treatment.

CRAFT methods are evidence-based and provide families with a hopeful, positive, and more effective alternative to addressing substance problems than other intervention programs. CRAFT works to change the loved one’s environment to make a non-substance using lifestyle more rewarding than one focused on using alcohol or other drugs. In the CRAFT model, concerned significant others (CSOs) are the focus of the therapy instead of the substance abuser. Randomized clinical trials have shown CRAFT 3 to 5 time better at engaging resistant substance users than Alanon or the Johnson Institute style.

For more information on CRAFT, click HERE:

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THERE!

FSDP Joins Forces with Global Partners for International Family Drug Support Day

FSDP is proud and excited to be partnering with organizations across the globe for International Family Drug Support Day on February 24, 2017!

FDSDayv2The 1st National Family Drug Support Day was held on February 24, 2016 coinciding with the anniversary of the passing of Damien Trimingham–the son of Tony Trimingham, founder of Australia’s Family Drug Support organization–from a drug-related overdose. National Family Drug Support Day was to be an annual event to highlight the need for families impacted by substance us to not only be recognized and heard but to be supported and encouraged to speak about their concerns and their needs.

In honor of the 20th anniversary of Family Drug Support, founder Tony Trimingham and FSDP Co-founders Barry Lessin and Carol Katz Beyer are joined by our friends and advocates standing in solidarity with Family Drug Support to raise awareness for the voice of the family to be heard around the world to be represented in the inaugural International Family Drug Support Day.

This year’s theme is #SeeThePersonNotTheDrug

The day is an annual event to highlight the need for families to not only be recognized and heard but to be supported and encouraged to speak about their concerns and their needs. The reality for many families is that there are limited programs and services available and many policies adversely affect families, all too often under a cloud of stigma and shame.

The objectives of the International Day are to:

  • Reduce stigma and discrimination for families and drug users
  • Promote family drug support services for families and friends
  • Promote harm reduction strategies for families and friends

In addition, the following issues will be highlighted:

  • The important role of FDS and FSDP volunteers in providing family support across Australia, the United States and the world.
  • Reducing fatal and non­fatal overdoses from drugs including pharmaceuticals.
  • Promoting the widespread availability of naloxone.
  • Promote greater inclusion of family members in the decision making process for families experiencing problematic drug use.
  • Promoting greater support and resources for treatment services.

Here’s what you can do:

  • Give a donation to help with the pamphlets, posters and badges being produced for the Day.
  • Share a photo and a story of 200 words or less of describing your loved one and we will post it on our Family Wall. Your message can be a remembrance of a loved one who has passed, a tribute to a family member’s recovery or a message of encouragement with helpful coping skills to maintain a healthy family relationship. Email us with your photos and stories and any questions you have to          Carol@fsdp.org or Barry@fsdp.org
  • Be an ambassador for change in your neighborhood by raising awareness within your community! Request to meet with your local schools, doctors, political representatives, law enforcement and clergy and we will provide you with a tool kit and promotional materials to support you in your advocacy. Talking points for communicating with the public are here.
  • Write or call your local state and federal legislators. To locate your US representative click here. Talking points for communicating with the legislators are here.
  • Invite friends, family or coworkers to share an informal gathering over food or coffee to share discussion and voice the issues.
  • Promote the Day on social media: #SeeThePersonNotTheDrug.

We welcome and encourage creative possibilities and opportunities to help you promote/plan your special event: town hall meetings, symposiums, themed collaborations with stakeholders and friends…contact us and let’s talk!

Please email us with your plans and ideas:  Carol@fsdp.org or Barry@fsdp.org

We look forward to make this event most memorable–with your help and support our loved ones will be free of shame and stigma and seen for who they are!

#SeeThePersonNotTheDrug

FSDP Brings the Voice of our Families to Aspiring Medical Professionals

IMG_1960One of FSDP’s missions is to bring the family voice to the various segments of our society that directly impact our health. So I was excited to be joined by FSDP members Brooke Feldman and Kenneth Anderson, as well as Fred Goldstein, Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) to share our perspectives on a panel discussion for medical students, “The Culture and Misperceptions of Addiction”, held at PCOM on Thursday, January 5, 2017.

The panel allowed us to reach healthcare providers at the beginning of their careers with a message about harm reduction, drug policy reform, progressive treatment and recovery, and substance use as public health and human rights issues. IMG_7851The audience of medical students were actively engaged and their questions prompted discussion about the nature of addiction, co-morbidity (dual diagnosis), engaging people in treatment, stigma, policy, epidemiology of substance use, impediments to effective care, conflicts of doctors…

Ken Anderson, founder of Harm Reduction, Abstinence and Moderation Support (HAMS) shared his expertise about the epidemiology and myths of substance use, addictIMG_7845ion, and recovery. Recovery advocate Brooke Feldman shared her unique perspectives on the lived experience of substance users, stigma, and the unique paths taken by people in recovery. I addressed some of the issues around the influences of culture and policy on substance users and families, and strategies for engaging young people and families in treatment.IMG_7846

Many thanks to our gracious hosts at PCOM, especially Maggie Gergen for coordinating the event, and FSDP Harm Reduction Epidemiologist April Wilson Smith for developing this event, and Co-Founder Carol Katz Beyer for her guidance.

FSDP at the Southern Opioid Epidemic Symposium

FSDP’s Co-Founders Barry Lessin and Carol Katz Beyer, and our Harm Reduction Coordinator Jeremy Galloway represented us at the Southern Opioid Epidemic Symposium held at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health this past week.

The symposium convened academic, medical, research, policy, and government stakeholders to identify and develop strategies to advance a comprehensive response to the opioid epidemic in the South and beyond.

Barry Lessin was invited to speak, and here’s the text of of his talk “The Significance of the Family in Developing Harm Reduction Strategies and Practices in the Southeast and Beyond:

15541250_1393299694023257_4760824146094682188_n“I’m an aging hippie from the VietNam war protest days when I came of age, during the drugs, sex, and rock and roll era and as a result developed an ingrained distrust of the federal government.

When FSDP was invited to join the Southern Collaborative on Opioid Harm Reduction , my initial thought was ‘Oh my God, I’m going to meet with the government to talk about drug use. I hope they don’t ask me too many questions about my past’. My worry and disbelief quickly dissolved when we got to the meeting and saw how serious the government is about attacking the opioid problem with comprehensive harm reduction …

We’re again a very divided nation, even more so in some ways, but I have optimism because of our ability to convene forums like this to tap into the brilliant minds gathered here to identify life-saving solutions to this public health epidemic.

So being here is an exciting and encouraging moment for myself, co-founder Carol Beyer, Jeremy Galloway and the 1000s of families and diverse stakeholders we represent because it’s an opportunity to be a part of process of an ongoing collaboration with this esteemed community to address the needs of the millions of families who have suffered the direct consequences and collateral damage of substance use and the existing harmful drug policies.

FSDP is a global coalition of families, professionals, organizations and drug policy reform advocates who view substance use through a human rights and public health lens. Viewed this way, Harm reduction interventions, are a natural fit for managing substance use, but have rarely found their way into family settings.

We have listened to our families, parents and users alike, sharing their lived experiences of being harmed by a broken treatment system that uses ineffective, often unregulated treatment methods, that treat people more like commodities to fill beds than patients being provided effective care.

When people relapse with other complex problems similar to addiction that require lifestyle changes like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, we don’t blame the person for treatment failures, we don’t tell them they’re in denial, or they ‘need to ready’ or they must ‘hit bottom, we don’t throw them in jail, or kick them out of schools.

With other conditions, we respond with scientific, commonsense, and compassionate approaches and we look at the treatment methods that are failing them and do more research to provide better treatments.

Families are in a unique position to directly influence the development or resolution of substance use problems because substance use doesn’t take place in a vacuum but in the normal context of family life and relationships as well as the wider culture that the family resides in.

We know that problematic substance use is a complex interaction of psychological, biological and socio-cultural variables. Prohibition-based drug policies directly contribute to a cultural narrative that views the substance as the primary problem, ignoring the uniqueness of each family, the culture it exists in, as well as the family’s strengths and resources.

We don’t have to reinvent the wheel–harm reduction approaches are already in place for other conditions. We can use this knowledge to extend these benefits to implement family-friendly strategies and practices in combatting the opioid problem.

FSDP bring diverse communities together to embrace enlightened drug policies—empowering families, restoring health, saving lives. We are dedicated to identify a vision and approach that will provide solutions and pathways forward…

Our meeting here offers us an opportunity for us to engage with the communities brought together here who share the public health lens of substance use, to be catalysts for change by tapping into your knowledge as scientists, educators, and healthcare providers to eventually develop the necessary strategies and practices and the hands-on tools to offer our families to restore our health to the level we deserve.”

Families for Sensible Drug Policy at the 11th National Harm Reduction Conference in San Diego!

12809723_996162890465550_5205762628852637136_nEvery two years, the leaders and the soldiers in the fight for sane and sensible drug policy gather together for three days of learning, laughing, sharing, and sometimes crying.  At the 11th National Harm Reduction Conference, people from all wings of the movement – needle exchange pioneers, treatment professionals, activists, and families who have fought a drug war in their own homes – join forces.

It was my first Harm Reduction Conference, yet I felt I was among friends.  Meeting FSDP Co-founder Carol Katz Beyer for the first time was like hugging a family member I hadn’t seen in years.  No one has to ask each other why they’re there – we all share a bond of feeling, very personally, the wreckage of the drug war and the impact it has had on those we love.  

The FSDP booth in the Exhibition Hall was buzzing.  We met AIDS educators, Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) members, needle exchange pioneers from states where needle exchange is still illegal, and marijuana legalization advocates.  I was especially excited with Jeannie Little, co-author of Over the Influence and one of my personal heroines, came by the table.   The heroes of harm reduction – people whose books decorate my coffee table and serve as references in my masters’ thesis – are so warm and accessible, happy to chat with a newbie and share a hug.  

Many of our members presented or spoke on panels:

“Missed Opportunities for Intervention in Correctional Facilities: Barriers to Harm Reduction Interventions and Solutions for Change”– Dale Schafer, FDSP Legal Advocate and Sentencing Reform Specialist, and Julie Apperson, FSDP Correctional Health Reform Advocate. 

“Nine Stories: The Experience of LGBT Individuals in 12 Step Rehab”– April Wilson Smith, FSDP Harm Reduction Epidemiologist 

“Red State Harm Reduction: Naloxone, Medical Amnesty and Drug Policy in the Bible Belt–Jeremy Galloway, FSDP Harm Reduction Coordinator 

IMG_3951One of the highlights of the conference was the panel on Health and Correctional issues, where FSDP Legal Advisor and Sentencing Reform Specialist Dale C. Schafer and FSDP Corrections Health Reform Advocate Julie Apperson spoke (pictured at right).  Dale talked about his experience spending 52 months in prison for growing a small amount of marijuana. It was hard to believe that such a distinguished attorney had actually spent time behind bars, and for nothing more than growing a medicinal plant to give to some friends who were sick.  

Julie spoke about her work to reform the prison health system, where inmates are routinely denied needed services. Medication is used as a weapon by guards who can arbitrarily deny inmates access to needed pills.  Psychiatric care is almost impossible to get, and even if a patient has insurance on the outside, they are not able to use that insurance to pay for needed care on the inside.  Julie’s passion for reforming prison health services led her to change her nursing career and go into the difficult world of behavioral health.  Her own son is currently in a correctional facility, and she fights for the rights of people like him every day.

The Harm Reduction Conference was such a big event that one post couldn’t hope to cover it, but one thing was clear: Families for Sensible Drug Policy is an internationally recognized voice for the families who have been affected by the senseless drug war.  Everywhere we went, leaders in the movement recognized us and sought us out.  We contribute a unique perspective to the conversation on drug policy – a conversation that all too often leaves our voices out.  

Being a part of team FSDP at the Harm Reduction Conference left me energized and ready to take on the fight!  Hope to see you there next time!  

— April Wilson Smith, FSDP Harm Reduction Epidemiologist