Special Evening for Families with Dr. Robert Meyers, Developer of CRAFT

FSDP’s latest collaboration with Dr. Bob Meyers, the developer of Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT), and Andrew Tatarsky and his Center for Optimal Living will give attendees a unique opportunity to meet Drs. Meyers and Tatarsky, hear an overview of the CRAFT treatment model and be part of a Q & A to follow.

FAMILY CRAFT

This special evening will be hosted by FSDP Cofounders Carol Katz Beyer and Barry Lessin.

WHEN AND WHERE:

Friday March 10, 2017, 6:30- 8pm.

The Center for Optimal Living, 370 Lexington Ave, Suite 500, NYC 10017

Tickets are still available but space is LIMITED, so SIGN-UP NOW!

For additional information, please email barry@fsdp.org.

CRAFT fosters a different journey toward treatment and recovery for families. It is love-based and empowers families to stay TOGETHER rather than “detaching” or using harsh, punishing methods with loved ones.

Supported by 20 years of peer-reviewed research, CRAFT is a comprehensive behavioral program that teaches families to optimize their impact while avoiding confrontation or detachment. Most programs developed to promote or encourage positive lifestyle changes are not always built upon the level of long-term research and analysis that supports CRAFT as a successful model for engaging substance users toward treatment.

CRAFT methods are evidence-based and provide families with a hopeful, positive, and more effective alternative to addressing substance problems than other intervention programs. CRAFT works to change the loved one’s environment to make a non-substance using lifestyle more rewarding than one focused on using alcohol or other drugs. In the CRAFT model, concerned significant others (CSOs) are the focus of the therapy instead of the substance abuser. Randomized clinical trials have shown CRAFT 3 to 5 time better at engaging resistant substance users than Alanon or the Johnson Institute style.

For more information on CRAFT, click HERE:

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU THERE!

FSDP Brings the Voice of our Families to Aspiring Medical Professionals

IMG_1960One of FSDP’s missions is to bring the family voice to the various segments of our society that directly impact our health. So I was excited to be joined by FSDP members Brooke Feldman and Kenneth Anderson, as well as Fred Goldstein, Ph.D., Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) to share our perspectives on a panel discussion for medical students, “The Culture and Misperceptions of Addiction”, held at PCOM on Thursday, January 5, 2017.

The panel allowed us to reach healthcare providers at the beginning of their careers with a message about harm reduction, drug policy reform, progressive treatment and recovery, and substance use as public health and human rights issues. IMG_7851The audience of medical students were actively engaged and their questions prompted discussion about the nature of addiction, co-morbidity (dual diagnosis), engaging people in treatment, stigma, policy, epidemiology of substance use, impediments to effective care, conflicts of doctors…

Ken Anderson, founder of Harm Reduction, Abstinence and Moderation Support (HAMS) shared his expertise about the epidemiology and myths of substance use, addictIMG_7845ion, and recovery. Recovery advocate Brooke Feldman shared her unique perspectives on the lived experience of substance users, stigma, and the unique paths taken by people in recovery. I addressed some of the issues around the influences of culture and policy on substance users and families, and strategies for engaging young people and families in treatment.IMG_7846

Many thanks to our gracious hosts at PCOM, especially Maggie Gergen for coordinating the event, and FSDP Harm Reduction Epidemiologist April Wilson Smith for developing this event, and Co-Founder Carol Katz Beyer for her guidance.

FSDP to Address Aspiring Medical Professionals in Philadelphia, PA

14731154_10154153120499195_2687285408442853763_n - Version 2Families for Sensible Drug Policy (FSDP) Co-Founder Barry Lessin and FSDP members Brooke Feldman and Kenneth Anderson will be on a panel to discuss “The Culture and Misperceptions of Addiction” with medical students at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine on Thursday, January 5, 2017, 5:30 to 7:30pm this Thursday.   This is an amazing opportunity to reach healthcare providers at the beginning of their careers with a message about harm reduction and compassionate, evidence-based care for substance use problems.  

Said Barry, “I spent most of my career as an abstinence-only, one-size-fits-all psychologist until I became aware of the War on Drugs five years ago and began viewing drug use and people who use them through a human rights and public health lens. I realize now that using this model was doing more harm than good by reinforcing stigma and shame by blaming my clients for the lack of success in treatment. I now embrace a harm reduction, client-centric approach and feel it’s important to share my harm reduction knowledge and experience with people who will have an important impact in providing care.”

Brooke Feldman, an outspoken recovery advocate and Huffington Post columnist [link], as well as FSDP member, said, “It is imperative that all medical professionals understand substance use and its related impact on whole health and wellness.  Only through truly understanding the delicate interplay between mental and physical health, including alcohol and other drug use, medical professionals can be best positioned to practice the holistic, integrated care that is the future of quality healthcare in this country.”

Kenneth Anderson, Executive Director and Founder of Harm Reduction, Abstinence and Moderation Support (HAMS) and long time FSDP member, broke down the myths and facts he plans to address at the session:

Myths and facts about substance use disorders

Myth: Everyone with an addiction dies from it unless they get addiction treatment.

Fact: 90% of people with alcohol dependence recover whether they get treatment or not. For drug dependence the rates are even higher; 98-99%.

Myth: Lifetime abstinence from all mood altering substances except caffeine and nicotine is necessary for recovery from addiction. 

Fact: Half of all people with alcohol dependence recover via controlled drinking. Marijuana is frequently an exit drug from more harmful substances.

Myth: Addiction treatment is effective.

Fact: Most treatment centers do not use evidence based treatment even if they claim to do so for the sake of collecting insurance payments. The odds of dying of heroin overdose after graduating from a 28 day inpatient program are 3,000% higher than if one continues to use heroin with no treatment.

Myth: Patients must be confronted and forced against their will into AA because they are in denial and only the 12 step program is effective.

Fact: The more people are confronted the more they will drink. Actually listening to what the client wants is the most effective approach here as it is everywhere else. Although some people benefit from the AA fellowship, others, including myself, are greatly harmed by it. I nearly drank myself to death before I left AA.

FSDP continues to be the voice of families affected by the cruel and ineffective drug war, everywhere from the meetings where policy is made to the institutions where new healthcare professionals are trained.  Stay tuned for an update after the event!  

 

FSDP at the Southern Opioid Epidemic Symposium

FSDP’s Co-Founders Barry Lessin and Carol Katz Beyer, and our Harm Reduction Coordinator Jeremy Galloway represented us at the Southern Opioid Epidemic Symposium held at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health this past week.

The symposium convened academic, medical, research, policy, and government stakeholders to identify and develop strategies to advance a comprehensive response to the opioid epidemic in the South and beyond.

Barry Lessin was invited to speak, and here’s the text of of his talk “The Significance of the Family in Developing Harm Reduction Strategies and Practices in the Southeast and Beyond:

15541250_1393299694023257_4760824146094682188_n“I’m an aging hippie from the VietNam war protest days when I came of age, during the drugs, sex, and rock and roll era and as a result developed an ingrained distrust of the federal government.

When FSDP was invited to join the Southern Collaborative on Opioid Harm Reduction , my initial thought was ‘Oh my God, I’m going to meet with the government to talk about drug use. I hope they don’t ask me too many questions about my past’. My worry and disbelief quickly dissolved when we got to the meeting and saw how serious the government is about attacking the opioid problem with comprehensive harm reduction …

We’re again a very divided nation, even more so in some ways, but I have optimism because of our ability to convene forums like this to tap into the brilliant minds gathered here to identify life-saving solutions to this public health epidemic.

So being here is an exciting and encouraging moment for myself, co-founder Carol Beyer, Jeremy Galloway and the 1000s of families and diverse stakeholders we represent because it’s an opportunity to be a part of process of an ongoing collaboration with this esteemed community to address the needs of the millions of families who have suffered the direct consequences and collateral damage of substance use and the existing harmful drug policies.

FSDP is a global coalition of families, professionals, organizations and drug policy reform advocates who view substance use through a human rights and public health lens. Viewed this way, Harm reduction interventions, are a natural fit for managing substance use, but have rarely found their way into family settings.

We have listened to our families, parents and users alike, sharing their lived experiences of being harmed by a broken treatment system that uses ineffective, often unregulated treatment methods, that treat people more like commodities to fill beds than patients being provided effective care.

When people relapse with other complex problems similar to addiction that require lifestyle changes like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, we don’t blame the person for treatment failures, we don’t tell them they’re in denial, or they ‘need to ready’ or they must ‘hit bottom, we don’t throw them in jail, or kick them out of schools.

With other conditions, we respond with scientific, commonsense, and compassionate approaches and we look at the treatment methods that are failing them and do more research to provide better treatments.

Families are in a unique position to directly influence the development or resolution of substance use problems because substance use doesn’t take place in a vacuum but in the normal context of family life and relationships as well as the wider culture that the family resides in.

We know that problematic substance use is a complex interaction of psychological, biological and socio-cultural variables. Prohibition-based drug policies directly contribute to a cultural narrative that views the substance as the primary problem, ignoring the uniqueness of each family, the culture it exists in, as well as the family’s strengths and resources.

We don’t have to reinvent the wheel–harm reduction approaches are already in place for other conditions. We can use this knowledge to extend these benefits to implement family-friendly strategies and practices in combatting the opioid problem.

FSDP bring diverse communities together to embrace enlightened drug policies—empowering families, restoring health, saving lives. We are dedicated to identify a vision and approach that will provide solutions and pathways forward…

Our meeting here offers us an opportunity for us to engage with the communities brought together here who share the public health lens of substance use, to be catalysts for change by tapping into your knowledge as scientists, educators, and healthcare providers to eventually develop the necessary strategies and practices and the hands-on tools to offer our families to restore our health to the level we deserve.”

A Treatment and Support Guide for the Rest of Us

Good Treatment is Hard to Find

I spent a decade using heroin and about nine years trying to stop. It’s not that I didn’t want to quit–I didn’t know where to turn. In my Internet research and through word-of-mouth, I either came up empty or ran into a lot of myths and misinformation. Stigma created an additional barrier to me getting the help I wanted.

In recent years we’ve learned much more about addiction and effective treatments, but significant barriers remain. While the county I live in has one of the highest overdose rates in the state, there are no opioid treatment providers. This is a common problem in rural, and even some urban and suburban, areas.

With that in mind, here’s a comprehensive (though not overwhelming) list of treatment and support options which are either evidence-based or use evidence-based tools, followed by links to harm reduction resources. Harm reduction organizations provide education, treatment referrals, naloxone overdose rescue kits, syringe exchange programs, access to contraception, HIV and hepatitis C testing, and other vital services which might otherwise remain unmet.

Everyone is different and there are many pathways to recovery. Guides like this will grant broader access to recovery resources for people who want to stop harmful substance use, without having to navigate through a series of ads and promotional materials, and provide access to life-saving tools for active substance users and people with mental health disorders.

Jeremy G


Find Treatment:

Self Empowering Addiction Treatment Association Provider Directory
SAMHSA Methadone Treatment Locator
SAMHSA Buprenorphine (Suboxone) Physician Locator
SAMHSA Comprehensive Treatment Locator
Comprehensive Directory of Methadone Treatment Providers (US & Canada)
Moderation Management for Alcohol

Support Groups:

Self-Management and Recovery Training: SMART Recovery, offers structured in-person and 24×7 online meetings)
LifeRing Secular Recovery
SOS Sobriety (Secular Sobriety)
Women for Sobriety
Harm Reduction for Alcohol (HAMS) Support Group
Mental Health Peer-Support Resources
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Support Directory

Resources for Parents:

Drug Policy Alliance’s Safety First Program
Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training: CRAFT (for Parents and Families)
SMART for Family and Friends Online Resources
Families for Sensible Drug Policy: FSDP

Harm Reduction Resources:

What is Harm Reduction? from Harm Reduction International and Drug Policy Alliance
Harm Reduction Publications from Harm Reduction Coalition
Connect Locally to Harm Reduction Organizations in Your Area
International Network for People Who Use Drugs: INPUD

Originally posted at: Making Noise in the South


Useful Videos:

Stanton Peele: What is Harm Reduction

Tom Horvath, founder of Practical Recovery and SMART Recovery, on Self Empowering Addiction Treatment

“Everything You Think You Know About Addiction is Wrong” from Kurzgesagt (based on the work of Johann Hari)

Intro to CRAFT (Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training): CRAFT vs Alternatives

We’re Bringing Dr. Robert Meyer’s CRAFT Workshop to Philadelphia

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We are excited to be partnering with the Parents Translational Research Center at the Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia, PA to bring Dr. Robert Meyers highly acclaimed Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) workshop to Philadelphia, PA from March 28, 2016 — March 30, 2016.

Supported by 20 years of peer-reviewed research, Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) is a comprehensive behavioral program that teaches families to optimize their impact on substance using loved ones while avoiding confrontation or detachment. CRAFT methods are evidence-based and provide families with a hopeful, positive, and more effective alternative to addressing substance problems than other intervention programs.

For complete information about the workshop click here: CRAFT PHILADELPHIA Brochure. Space is limited, so sign up today. Completion of this training is the first step toward becoming a certified CRAFT therapist. Continuing Education credits will be awarded upon satisfactory completion. For those of you who aren’t aware of CRAFT or if you want more information about the CRAFT approach, please check out this link.

Below is a testimonial by Dr. William R. Miller about Bob Meyers and the CRAFT trainings:

‘Bob Meyers has made exemplary contributions to knowledge about the treatment of substance abuse and dependence, overseeing two decades of programmatic research to develop, refine, adapt, test and disseminate CRAFT. Bob is an exceptional human being and colleague. He is a superb clinical teacher who garners top marks from audiences ranging from counselors in recovery to doctoral-level health professionals. Dr. Meyers brings extraordinary energy, compassion, depth and humanity to his research, treatment and training’. 

William R. Miller, Ph.D. Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry. 

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We look forward to seeing all interested mental health professionals there!

 

Transforming Trauma into Recovery

Harm reduction psychotherapy affords us the opportunity to empower people by engaging people’s strengths and tap into their resilience to not only develop a healing path for themselves but also, if they choose to, for their family.

Here’s an article that describes my work with a woman in individual treatment and how she was able to apply her progress in treatment to overcome barriers and positively impact her role as a mother with her substance using son.

I’m curious about some of the barriers our community members have faced/ are facing in working to improve family relationships?

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Helping Teens with Substance Use Problems: Why I Changed My Approach

The future of SUD treatment will acknowledge that teens’ and young adults’ substance use is not assumed to be a disease process but occurs in the context of normal adolescent development. Treatment will focus on helping young people develop strategies and skills to make healthier choices and manage their emotions more effectively.

Family therapy will be a part of treatment where appropriate to empower parents and offer a road map for them to be more effective parents going forward.

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